Idiomatic expression, phrasal verbs and phrasal noun?

Idiomatic expression, phrasal verbs and phrasal noun?

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Answers (5)

agbojays
5 days ago
Idiomatic expressions are a type of informal English
that have a meaning different from the meaning of
the words in the expression.
  • agbojays: Here's an example of an idiomatic expression.
    "Hold your tongue."
    This idiom does not actually mean that you should
    stick your fingers in your mouth and grab a hold of
    your tongue. It means that you shouldn't talk.
    Like 0    Dislike 0   5 days ago
agbojays
5 days ago
A phrasal verb is a verb that is made up of a main
verb together with an adverb or a preposition, or both.
  • agbojays: Note; Phrasal Verbs has a different meaning when it's in a sentence from when it is alone as a phrase E.g

    She has always looked down
    on me.
    Fighting broke out among a
    group of 40 men.
    I’ll see to the animals.
    Don’t put me off, I’m trying to
    concentrate.
    The report spelled out the
    need for more staff.
    For instance, in the first example, the phrasal verb ‘to
    look down on someone’ doesn’t mean that you are
    looking down from a higher place at someone who is
    below you; it means that you think that you are better
    than someone.
    Like 0    Dislike 0   5 days ago
agbojays
5 days ago
While phrasal verbs are a series of two or three
words together, like "call back," phrasal nouns
are usually one word, like "callback" or two words
connected with a hyphen, like "Flare-up".
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