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Evaluating The Pattern Of Residential Quality In Nigeria - Osogbo As A Case Study

Type Project Topics
Faculty Engineering, Environment & Technology
Course Estate Management
Price ₦3,000
Key Features:
- No of Pages: 49

- No of Chapters: 05

- Detailed date presentation and analysis
Introduction:

Abstract



The sustainability of infrastructure demands an attention. One of the ways to achieve this is the adoption of maintenance as essential practice. The level of this practice among various users demands urgency for policy formation. The study examined the maintenance practice among the users of residential buildings in Nigeria. The study data were collected through questionnaire administered on the users of residential buildings in the study area. The data collected were subjected to descriptive statistical tools. The study found out that all respondents carried out one form of maintenance activities to other. Majority does not have maintenance manual and economic is the major factor that affects the practice of maintenance among users of residential buildings. The study recommends a need for advocacy, policy and awareness on the essence of maintenance as a practice for national sustainability.

Table of Content



TITLE PAGE PAGES

CERTIFICATION

DEDICATION

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

ABSTRACT

TABLE OF CONTENT

CHAPTER ONE

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

1.2 THE STATEMENT OF RESEARCH PROBLEM

1.3 AIMS AND OBJECTIVE

1.4 JUSTIFICATION FOR THE STUDY

1.5 SCOPE OF THE STUDY

1.6 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

1.7 LIMITATION OF THE STUDY

1.8 DEFINITION OF KEY TERM





CHAPTER TWO

2.1 INTRODUCTION

2.0 LITERATURE REVIEW

2.2 DEFINITION OF TECHNICAL TERM

2.3 CRITICAL FOR HOUSING QUALITY EVALUATION

2.4 SOCIO-CULTURAL ISSUES IN HOUSING

2.5 INDICATORS FOR EVALUATING HOUSING QUALITY

2.6 CAUSES OF ENVIRONMENTAL DEGENERATION

2.7 CHARACTERISTICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL DEGENERATION

2.8 NEED FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING

CHAPTER THREE

3.0 CASE STUDY/STUDY AREA

3.1 A BRIEF BACKGROUND OF OSOGO

CHAPTER FOUR

4.0 DATA PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS

4.1 DATA ANALYSIS

CHAPTER FIVE

5.0 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, RECOMMENDATION AND CONCLUSION

5.1 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

5.2 CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

REFERENCES

Introduction

CHAPTER ONE

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY

Housing is defined as “the process of providing a large number of residential buildings on a permanent basis with adequate physical infrastructure and social amenities, (services) in planned, decent, safe, and sanitary neighbourhoods to meet the basic and special needs of the population” (Federal Ministry of Work and Housing, 2002 in Kuroshi and Bala, 2005).



Adequate housing therefore should provide protection from the elements, minimize the risk of disease and injury, and contribute to the physical, mental and social wellbeing of the occupants. Inadequate housing according to Neutze (1998) in Australian Bureau of Statistics (2006) can pose serious health risks.



Studies have shown that many residents of urban areas in developing countries live in inadequate housing and in neighbourhoods that lack the basic requirements of liveable environments (Dung-Gwom 2007, 2008; Rojas 2000; McLeod, 2001, 2003). Ooi and Phua (2007) have observed that most cities in developing world have become centres where vast numbers of people compete for the most basic social services and infrastructural facilities: for a room within reach of employment with an affordable rent, or vacant land on which a shelter can be erected without fear of eviction; for places in schools; for medical treatment for health problems or injuries, or a bed in a hospital; for access to clean drinking water; for a place on a bus or train; and for a corner on a pavement or square to sell some goods—quite apart from the enormous competition for jobs.



Serious challenges continue to exist in urban settlements ranging from scarcity of public services, marked social inequalities in habitat conditions, social and spatial segregation, inequality, poverty, unemployment and increased economic vulnerability, environmental degradation, complexities in the governance structures for urban environmental service provision, pollution, and vulnerability to technological and natural disasters (UN Commissions of Sustainable Development, 2004).



In recent times, there has been a growing concern on the deteriorating state of housing in most urban areas of the developing nations. Consequently, the need for a decent and adequate shelter has long been an issue requiring urgent global attention. Since shelter constitutes one of man's basic needs, it does have a profound impact on the health, wellbeing, social attitudes and economic productivity of the individual.



However, it has been pointed out that residential quality and the quality of life are two variables of the same equation. Thus, the quality of housing, being basically an important health element, affects the well-being of the people, their productivity, manner of living and the decencies of their lives.



Significantly, good quality housing provides the foundation for stable communities and social inclusion. Previous research has established that a positive correlation exists between the quality of life and the comfort, convenience and visual appeal of housing. Good quality housing is therefore essential to planning.



Existing realities have however indicated an apparent variation in housing characteristics across different regions. The consequences of adaptation and restructuring have resulted into differences in housing quality in different communities. This problem of differential housing quality is compounded by the very rapid urban growth.



However, studies have shown that the provision of appropriate housing, particularly for the urban poor constitutes a major challenge to development in most African countries and developing nations' at large. Despite increasing emphasis on the need to improve housing, particularly within the urban areas of the less developed countries (LDCs), a high proportion of the urban population are deprived of access to good quality housing.





Going by a UN-Habitat estimate, more than one billion of the world's city residents live in low quality housing, mostly in the sprawling slums and squatter settlements in developing countries. The reality is that this urban housing scenario has adverse implications on the general wellbeing of the people and portends severe danger to the socioeconomic and physical development of the nations at large.



In Nigeria, like in other developing nations, the provision of housing has been a major concern for some time. Access to decent and good quality housing has posed serious challenge to sustainable growth and development. While there has been an increasing demand for additional housing stock in the urban areas, the condition and overall quality of the existing stock falls short of the expected standard.



Consequently, the urban house forms accommodated extended families living with many inconveniences while spatial congestion and infrastructure overloads cause problem in living comfort.
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