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Changes English Language undergo through i. Meaning ii. Pronounciation iii. Spelling?

Changes English Language undergo through
i. Meaning
ii. Pronounciation
iii. Spelling?

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Answers (1)

Immaculate
1 month ago
Nice: This word used to mean “silly, f**lish, simple.” Far from the compliment it is today!
Silly: in its earliest uses, it referred to things worthy or blessed; from there it came to refer to the weak and vulnerable, and more recently to those who are f**lish
.Awful: Awful things used to be “worthy of awe” for a variety of reasons, which is how we get expressions like “the awful majesty of God.”.
Fathom: hard to fathom how this verb moved from meaning “to encircle with one’s arms” to meaning “to understand after much thought.”
Clue: Centuries ago, a clue (or clew) was a ball of yarn.
Myriad: If you had a myriad of things 600 years ago, it meant that you specifically had 10,000 of them — not just a lot.
Naughty: Long ago, if you were naughty, you had naught or nothing. Then it came to mean evil or immoral, and now you are just badly behaved.
Eerie: Before the word eerie described things that inspire fear, it used to describe people feeling fear — as in one could feel faint and eerie.
Spinster: As it sounds, spinsters used to be women who spun. It referred to a legal occupation before it came to mean “unmarried woman” — and often not in the most positive ways, as opposed to a bachelor …Bachelor: A bachelor was a young knight before the word came to refer to someone who had achieved the lowest rank at a university — and it lives on in that meaning in today’s B.A. and B.S degrees. It’s been used for unmarried men since Chaucer’s day.
Flirt: Some 500 years ago, flirting was flicking something away or flicking open a fan or otherwise making a brisk or jerky motion. Now it involves playing with people’s emotions (sometimes it may feel like your heart is getting jerked around in the process).Guy: This word is an eponym. It comes from the name of Guy Fawkes, who was part of a failed attempt to blow up Parliament in 1605. Folks used to burn his effigy, a “Guy Fawkes” or a “guy,” and from there it came to refer to a frightful figure. In the U.S., it has come to refer to men in general
Meat: It comes from an older meaning of the word meat that refers to food in general — solid food of a variety of kinds (not just animal flesh), as opposed to drink.

Pronunciation
words like sure, poor, tourstarted to sound identical to shore, pour, tore;

the weak vowels in words such as visibility, carelessness drifted away from the sound of kit;

people started to insert a t-sound in words such as prince, making it sound like prints;

a ch-sound became respectable in words such as perpetual, and a j-sound in graduate;

the glottal stop started to replace the traditional t-sound in phrases such as quite nice, it seems.

Spelling: the word "knife" in late Old English was spelled cnif ("c" and "k" often represent the same sound). Similarly, in Old English the word "knight" was spelled cniht.
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