what's the difference among devolution, deconcentration and delegated legislation?

what's the difference among devolution, deconcentration and delegated legislation?

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Answers (3)

isaaq
1 month ago
Delegation. Delegation is a more extensive form of decentralization. Through delegation central governments transfer responsibility for decision-making and administration of public functions to semi-autonomous organizations not wholly controlled by the central government, but ultimately accountable to it. Governments delegate responsibilities when they create public enterprises or corporations, housing authorities, transportation authorities, special service districts, semi-autonomous school districts, regional development corporations, or special project implementation units. Usually these organizations have a great deal of discretion in decision-making. They may be exempt from constraints on regular civil service personnel and may be able to charge users directly for services.
Devolution. A third type of administrative decentralization is devolution. When governments devolve functions, they transfer authority for decision-making, finance, and management to quasi-autonomous units of local government with corporate status. Devolution usually transfers responsibilities for services to municipalities that elect their own mayors and councils, raise their own revenues, and have independent authority to make investment decisions. In a devolved system, local governments have clear and legally recognized geographical boundaries over which they exercise authority and within which they perform public functions. It is this type of administrative decentralization that underlies most political decentralization.
Deconcentration. Deconcentration --which is often considered to be the weakest form of decentralization and is used most frequently in unitary states-- redistributes decision making authority and financial and management responsibilities among different levels of the central government. It can merely shift responsibilities from central government officials in the capital city to those working in regions, provinces or districts, or it can create strong field administration or local administrative capacity under the supervision of central government ministries.
EmX
1 month ago
“Decentralization means to hand over political, financial and administrative authority
from central to local (district/city) governments, so that the government can facilitate
and guarantee better public services for the people. Decentralization of the forestry
sector should, however, be viewed as a positive development to bring public servicescloser to the people through managing forest resources in a sustainable manner for the
community’s welfare” (Ministry of Forestry, Indonesia).
As mentioned above, there are various types of decentralization such as deconcentration,
devolution and delegation. Definitions of these terms as used in the papers are listed
below.
Deconcentration, is the term referring to:
• “The process by which the agents of central government control are relocated and
geographically dispersed” (Sayer et al.).
• “Administative decentralization, i.e. a transfer to lower-level central government
authorities, or to other local authorities who are upwardly accountable to the central
government” (Ribot 2002 in Larson).
• “The transfer of administrative responsibility for specified functions to lower levels
within the central government bureaucracy, generally on some spatial basis”
(Ferguson and Chandrasekharan).
• “One of administrative decentralization which redistributes decision-making authority
and financial and management responsibility among levels of the central government;
there is no real transfer of authority between levels of government. It may involve
only a shift of responsibilities from federal forest service officials of the capital city to
those stationed in provinces, districts, etc” (Gregersen et al.).
Devolution, refers to:
• “The transfer of ‘natural resource management to local individuals and institutions
located within and outside of government’ (Edmunds et al. 2003:1), though some
people use ‘devolution’ only in reference to direct community transfers” (Larson)
• “The transfer of rights and assets from the centre to local governments or
communities. All of these processes occur within the context of national laws that set
the limits within which any decentralised or devolved forest management occurs”
(Sayer et al.).
• “The transfer of governance responsibility for specified functions to sub-national
levels, either publicly or privately owned, that are largely outside the direct control of
the central government” (Ferguson and Chandrasekharan).
• “One form of administrative decentralization which transfers specific decision-
making powers from one level of government to another (which could be from lower
level to higher level of government, in the case of federations, or government
transfers decision-making powers to entities of the civil society. Regional or
provincial governments, for example, become semi autonomous and administer forest
resources according to their own priorities and within clear geographical boundaries
under their control. Most political decentralization is associated with devolution”
(Gregersen et al.).
Delegation, refers to:
• “The transfer of managerial responsibility for specified functions to other public
organizations outside normal central government control, whether provincial or local
government or parastatal agencies” (Ferguson and Chandrasekharan).

“One form of administrative decentralization which transfers responsibilities and
authority to semi-autonomous entities that respond to the central government but are
not totally controlled by it. Public forestry corporations and in some cases
implementation units of some forestry projects–often donor supported--are examples
of this form of decentralization” (Gregersen et al.)
Besides deconcentration, devolution and delegation, there is another form called
privatisation. Ferguson and Chandrasekharan include privatisation as a particular form of
devolution to private ownership that has become prominent in recent times (Ferguson and
Chandrasekharan). However Ribot in his paper says that privatization is not a form of
decentralization.
Gaby
1 month ago
Delegation. Delegation is a more extensive
form of decentralization. Through
delegation central governments transfer
responsibility for decision-making and
administration of public functions to semi-
autonomous organizations not wholly
controlled by the central government, but
ultimately accountable to it. Governments
delegate responsibilities when they create
public enterprises or corporations, housing
authorities, transportation authorities,
special service districts, semi-autonomous
school districts, regional development
corporations, or special project
implementation units. Usually these
organizations have a great deal of
discretion in decision-making. They may be
exempt from constraints on regular civil
service personnel and may be able to
charge users directly for services.
Devolution. A third type of administrative
decentralization is devolution. When
governments devolve functions, they
transfer authority for decision-making,
finance, and management to quasi-
autonomous units of local government with
corporate status. Devolution usually
transfers responsibilities for services to
municipalities that elect their own mayors
and councils, raise their own revenues, and
have independent authority to make
investment decisions. In a devolved system,
local governments have clear and legally
recognized geographical boundaries over
which they exercise authority and within
which they perform public functions. It is
this type of administrative decentralization
that underlies most political
decentralization.
Deconcentration. Deconcentration --which
is often considered to be the weakest form
of decentralization and is used most
frequently in unitary states-- redistributes
decision making authority and financial and
management responsibilities among
different levels of the central government. It
can merely shift responsibilities from
central government officials in the capital
city to those working in regions, provinces
or districts, or it can create strong field
administration or local administrative
capacity under the supervision of central
government ministries.
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