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Which of the following is involved in secondary thickening in plant?A.collenchyma and xylem cells B.vascular...

Which of the following is involved in secondary thickening in plant?A.collenchyma and xylem cells B.vascular cambium and collenchyma cells C.Vascular cambium and cork cambium D.cork cambium and sclerenchyma?

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Answers (6)

EmX
1 month ago
The answer is C.
vascular cambium and cork cambium.

Meristems contribute to both primary (taller/longer) and secondary (wider) growth. Primary growth is controlled by root apical meristems or shoot apical meristems, while secondary growth is controlled by the two lateral meristems, called the vascular cambium and the cork cambium. Not all plants exhibit secondary growth.
delibee
1 month ago
The answer is C.Vascular cambium and cork

In many vascular plants, secondary growth is the result of the activity of the two lateral meristems, the cork cambium and vascular cambium. Arising from lateral meristems, secondary growth increases the girth of the plant root or stem, rather than its length. As long as the lateral meristems continue to produce new cells, the stem or root will continue to grow in diameter. In woody plants, this process produces wood, and shapes the plant into a tree with a thickened trunk.

Because this growth usually ruptures the epidermis of the stem or roots, plants with secondary growth usually also develop a cork cambium. The cork cambium gives rise to thickened cork cells to protect the surface of the plant and reduce water loss. If this is kept up over many years, this process may produce a layer of cork. In the case of the cork oak it will yield harvestable cork.
In botany, secondary growth is the growth that results from cell division in the cambia or lateral meristems and that causes the stems and roots to thicken, while primary growth is growth that occurs as a result of cell division at the tips of stems and roots, causing them to elongate, and gives rise to primary tissue. Secondary growth occurs in most seed plants, but monocots usually lack secondary growth. If they do have secondary growth, it differs from the typical pattern of other seed plants.

The formation of secondary vascular tissues from the cambium is a characteristic feature of dicotyledons and gymnoman-fluids. In certain monocots, the vascular tissues are also increased after the primary growth is completed but the cambium of these plants is of a different nature. In the living Pteridophytes this feature is rare but occurs in plants like Isoetes and Botrychium.
mhz vee
1 month ago
The answer is C.Vascular cambium and cork

In many vascular plants, secondary growth is the result of the activity of the two lateral meristems, the cork cambium and vascular cambium. Arising from lateral meristems, secondary growth increases the girth of the plant root or stem, rather than its length. As long as the lateral meristems continue to produce new cells, the stem or root will continue to grow in diameter. In woody plants, this process produces wood, and shapes the plant into a tree with a thickened trunk.

Because this growth usually ruptures the epidermis of the stem or roots, plants with secondary growth usually also develop a cork cambium. The cork cambium gives rise to thickened cork cells to protect the surface of the plant and reduce water loss. If this is kept up over many years, this process may produce a layer of cork. In the case of the cork oak it will yield harvestable cork.
In botany, secondary growth is the growth that results from cell division in the cambia or lateral meristems and that causes the stems and roots to thicken, while primary growth is growth that occurs as a result of cell division at the tips of stems and roots, causing them to elongate, and gives rise to primary tissue. Secondary growth occurs in most seed plants, but monocots usually lack secondary growth. If they do have secondary growth, it differs from the typical pattern of other seed plants.

The formation of secondary vascular tissues from the cambium is a characteristic feature of dicotyledons and gymnoman-fluids. In certain monocots, the vascular tissues are also increased after the primary growth is completed but the cambium of these plants is of a different nature. In the living Pteridophytes this feature is rare but occurs in plants like Isoetes and Botrychium.
isaaq
1 month ago
The answer is C.Vascular cambium and cork

In many vascular plants, secondary growth is the result of the activity of the two lateral meristems, the cork cambium and vascular cambium. Arising from lateral meristems, secondary growth increases the girth of the plant root or stem, rather than its length. As long as the lateral meristems continue to produce new cells, the stem or root will continue to grow in diameter. In woody plants, this process produces wood, and shapes the plant into a tree with a thickened trunk.

Because this growth usually ruptures the epidermis of the stem or roots, plants with secondary growth usually also develop a cork cambium. The cork cambium gives rise to thickened cork cells to protect the surface of the plant and reduce water loss. If this is kept up over many years, this process may produce a layer of cork. In the case of the cork oak it will yield harvestable cork.
In botany, secondary growth is the growth that results from cell division in the cambia or lateral meristems and that causes the stems and roots to thicken, while primary growth is growth that occurs as a result of cell division at the tips of stems and roots, causing them to elongate, and gives rise to primary tissue. Secondary growth occurs in most seed plants, but monocots usually lack secondary growth. If they do have secondary growth, it differs from the typical pattern of other seed plants.

The formation of secondary vascular tissues from the cambium is a characteristic feature of dicotyledons and gymnoman-fluids. In certain monocots, the vascular tissues are also increased after the primary growth is completed but the cambium of these plants is of a different nature. In the living Pteridophytes this feature is rare but occurs in plants like Isoetes and Botrychium.
Gaby
1 month ago
In many vascular plants, secondary growth
is the result of the activity of the two lateral
meristems, the cork cambium and vascular
cambium. Arising from lateral meristems,
secondary growth increases the girth of the
plant root or stem, rather than its length. As
long as the lateral meristems continue to
produce new cells, the stem or root will
continue to grow in diameter. In woody
plants, this process produces wood, and
shapes the plant into a tree with a
thickened trunk.
Because this growth usually ruptures the
epidermis of the stem or roots, plants with
secondary growth usually also develop a
cork cambium. The cork cambium gives rise
to thickened cork cells to protect the
surface of the plant and reduce water loss.
If this is kept up over many years, this
process may produce a layer of cork. In the
case of the cork oak it will yield harvestable
cork.
In botany, secondary growth is the growth
that results from cell division in the cambia
or lateral meristems and that causes the
stems and roots to thicken, while primary
growth is growth that occurs as a result of
cell division at the tips of stems and roots,
causing them to elongate, and gives rise to
primary tissue. Secondary growth occurs in
most seed plants, but monocots usually lack
secondary growth. If they do have
secondary growth, it differs from the typical
pattern of other seed plants.
The formation of secondary vascular tissues
from the cambium is a characteristic
feature of dicotyledons and gymnoman-
fluids. In certain monocots, the vascular
tissues are also increased after the primary
growth is completed but the cambium of
these plants is of a different nature. In the
living Pteridophytes this feature is rare but
occurs in plants like Isoetes and
Botrychium.
mizta smart
1 month ago
C.Vascular cambium and cork
In many vascular plants, secondary growth
is the result of the activity of the two lateral
meristems, the cork cambium and vascular
cambium. Arising from lateral meristems,
secondary growth increases the girth of the
plant root or stem, rather than its length. As
long as the lateral meristems continue to
produce new cells, the stem or root will
continue to grow in diameter. In woody
plants, this process produces wood, and
shapes the plant into a tree with a
thickened trunk.
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