if a cathode ray is deflected on to the electrode of an electrometer,it becomes?

if a cathode ray is deflected on to the electrode of an electrometer,it becomes?

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Answers (4)

isaaq
4 months ago
The answer is negatively charged.

In 1987 Sir J J Thomson discovered the electron while doing cathode ray experiments ( the rays which move from cathode to anode when an electric discharge is passed through a gas at low pressure), these are charges of negative electricity. When these cathode rays are deflected onto an electrode of an electrometer, the instrument measured a negative charge. The rays tested also were deflected by application of an electric field.
Gaby
4 months ago
In 1987 Sir J J Thomson discovered the
electron while doing cathode ray
experiments ( the rays which move from
cathode to anode when an electric
discharge is passed through a gas at low
pressure), these are charges of negative
electricity. When these cathode rays are
deflected onto an electrode of an
electrometer, the instrument measured a
negative charge. The rays tested also were
deflected by application of an electric field.
EmX
4 months ago
The answer is negatively charged.

In 1987 Sir J J Thomson discovered the electron while doing cathode ray experiments ( the rays which move from cathode to anode when an electric discharge is passed through a gas at low pressure), these are charges of negative electricity. When these cathode rays are deflected onto an electrode of an electrometer, the instrument measured a negative charge
delibee
4 months ago
Cathode rays (electron beam or e-beam) are streams of electrons observed in vacuum tubes. If an evacuated glass tube is equipped with two electrodes and a voltage is applied, glass behind the positive electrode is observed to glow, due to electrons emitted from the cathode (the electrode connected to the negative terminal of the voltage supply). They were first observed in 1869 by German physicist Julius Plücker and Johann Wilhelm Hittorf,[1] and were named in 1876 by Eugen Goldstein Kathodenstrahlen, or cathode rays.[2][3] In 1897, British physicist J. J. Thomson showed that cathode rays were composed of a previously unknown negatively charged particle, which was later named the electron. Cathode ray tubes (CRTs) use a focused beam of electrons deflected by electric or magnetic fields to render an image on a screen.
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